Carabiniere: where does this Italian word come from?

A carabiniere was, historically, a foot or horse soldier armed with a carabina, or long gun rifle. Today, in Italy, a carabiniere has both military and civilian policing functions. According to the Treccani dictionary, the term carabiniere doesn’t derive directly from carabina. Its authors tell us carabiniere comes from its French equivalent carabinier, and that carabina comes from its French equivalent carabine. Although the Italian … Continue reading Carabiniere: where does this Italian word come from?

Review Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 3, parts 13-16

Before we leave chapter 3 altogether and start chapter 4 of Le avventure di Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi, have a go at translating the following sentences from English to Italian, using language you’ve seen in the last four parts (part 13, part 14, part 15, part 16). You’re right to not trust him. He’s very likely to hit him. I haven’t the slightest idea. The killer cut the corpse up into pieces … Continue reading Review Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 3, parts 13-16

Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 3, part 16

This post completes our study of the Italian language appearing in chapter 3 of Carlo Collodi’s Le avventure di Pinocchio. After this post, you’ll have a chance to review important language from the last four parts in a translation exercise. Once you’ve completed your study of chapter 3, I encourage you to read the entire chapter again to appreciate your new understanding of the Italian text. The last … Continue reading Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 3, part 16

Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 3, part 15

After Pinocchio throws himself to the ground, some of the on-lookers in the street come to Pinocchio’s defence; in this post, we’ll look at the following portion of text in Italian from chapter 3 of Carlo Collodi’s Le avventure di Pinocchio: Chi ne diceva una, chi un’altra. — Povero burattino! — dicevano alcuni — ha ragione a non voler tornare a casa! Chi lo sa come lo picchierebbe quell’omaccio di … Continue reading Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 3, part 15

Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 3, part 14

After being returned to Geppetto by the carabiniere, Pinocchio throws himself to the ground and attracts the attention of standers-by. We’ll now look at the following portion of text from chapter 3 of Le avventure di Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi: Allora lo prese per la collottola, e, mentre lo riconduceva indietro, gli disse tentennando minacciosamente il capo: — Andiamo subito a casa. Quando saremo a casa, non dubitare … Continue reading Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 3, part 14

Spaghetti: where does this Italian word come from?

The image you see shows a ball of twine. What does twine have to do with spaghetti? Everything, because the Italian word for twine is ultimately where spaghetti got its name. Spaghetti resembles twine, and, in Italian, twine is called spago. If we add the ending etto to spago, we get spaghetto. (The h is inserted so that the g continues to be pronouced hard … Continue reading Spaghetti: where does this Italian word come from?

Learn Italian from the Bible: Genesis 2:1-7

This post begins our study of chapter 2 of the Book of Genesis. I invite you to read through the entire chapter in Italian before beginning; you’ll find a link to an Italian version of the Bible online in the index. We’ll now look at verses 1-7, which read as follows: 1Così furono portati a compimento il cielo e la terra e tutte le loro schiere. … Continue reading Learn Italian from the Bible: Genesis 2:1-7

Learn Italian from the oral tradition: Preghiera per la Patria

Preghiera per la Patria is a military prayer, or una preghiera militare. Immediately below is the text of the prayer in Italian, followed by a video where you can hear it recited. After the video, I’ve provided two translations into English: one literal, and another in idiomatic language. Preghiera per la Patria   Dio onnipotente ed eterno cui danno gloria il cielo, la terra e … Continue reading Learn Italian from the oral tradition: Preghiera per la Patria

Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 3, part 13

Pinocchio, who’s escaped from Geppetto’s house and is running in the street, is stopped by a carabiniere, who returns him to Geppetto. In this post, we’ll look at the following portion of text in Italian from chapter 3 of Le avventure di Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi: Il carabiniere, senza punto smuoversi, lo acciuffò pulitamente per il naso (era un nasone spropositato, che pareva fatto apposta per essere … Continue reading Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 3, part 13

Review Italian from the Bible: Genesis 1:20-31

We’ve now seen the entirety of chapter 1 of the Book of Genesis in Italian. If you’ve worked through the last three parts (verses 20-23, 24-26, 27-31), then test your knowledge of the language you’ve encountered by translating the sentences in part A from English to Italian. Do your best to make your translations match the wordings we’ve seen from the Bible. In part B, test your knowledge … Continue reading Review Italian from the Bible: Genesis 1:20-31